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09/21/11 IECex/ATEX and North American NEC HAZLOC Equipment Classification

Article- September 2011 By Larson Electronics.com

Larson Electronics Explosion Proof LED Paint Spray Booth Fixture



The goal of this article is to provide a semi-detailed overview of the dominant forms of hazardous location regulations according to region and provide the information needed to allow some comparison between these different types. This is not a full or completely descriptive text and for complete details the individual should reference the relevant regulating bodies according to the applicable region.

For North American and Canadian applications, the National Fire Protection Agency NEC publications, and the Canadian CEC should be referenced. For the EU and related regions, CENLEC and the the European Committee for Electrotechnical Standardization ATEX Directive should be consulted. For international standardization, the IEC and its IECex Scheme should be referenced.

Standards, the rules for approval and certification, and the accepted testing bodies occasionally overlap regions and change or are added to frequently, thus it is up to the individual to keep abreast of which of these may affect them.

 


United States Hazardous Location and Equipment Classification

Classification of hazardous locations and the certification of equipment to be used in these environments varies depending upon which country you are in, which can make the determination of equipment suitability difficult at times to say the least. For North America, a classification system is used based upon the National Electrical Code as published by the National Fire Protection Association. This system consists of Classes, Divisions, Groups and/or Zones and is designed to provide a way to assess the conditions of a given location, ensure equipment meets minimum standards, and easily match equipment and operational procedures to these conditions properly for safe operation.

 

Determination of conditions at a given location is the responsibility of the Owners or Operators, Insurance Companies, and the regulating bodies having jurisdiction such as OSHA for the United States. Approval of equipment for use within specific Classes, Divisions, Groups and/or Zones is done by federally and state recognized independent testing organizations such as Underwriters Laboratories wherein the suitability of equipment is tested and verified according to NEC standards.

 

A basic typical US classification will appear as “Class 1, Division 1, Groups A, B, C and D.” Each label refers to a specific property of the hazardous environment according to the materials and conditions that are encountered. “Class” refers to the basic nature of the hazardous environment according to the type of materials that are present, “Division” refers to the probability of the hazard, and “Group” refers to the specific type of hazardous material present within the hazardous location.

Groups A through C refer to gases and vapors, and groups E through G refer to combustible dusts. Materials are grouped according to their physical properties ie gases/vapors, and explosive properties ie, their potential explosive power.

 

Groups do not address the ignition temperature of materials. So, since two materials may be within the same group due to similar explosive potential, they can both have very different ignition temperatures. As a result, all explosion proof or HAZLOC approved equipment designated Class 1 also carries a separate temperature rating designating the maximum surface operating temperature of the device, which in turn tells us how safe the device is for use in proximity to various materials based on their ignition temperature. This means that a device rated for a maximum operating surface temperature of 85- C would not be safe or approved for environments where the ignition temperature of the material it is exposed to is below 85- C, even if the device is Group D approved and the materials it is exposed to fit within a Group D designation.

 

Further classifications may be included to denote the maximum surface operating temperature of the equipment known as the Temperature Code as noted above, the protection against ingress of foriegn materials (water, dusts, solid objects) known as Ingress Protection Ratings, and various NEMA codes and less common specialised certifications and compliances not normally required by NEC regulations.

A breakdown of the basic North American classifications is as follows.

 


Classes

Class 1 refers to Flammable Gases and Vapors.

Class 2 refers to combustible and electrically conductive dusts.

Class 3 refers to fibers and flyings such as wood chips. Class 3 is a singular designation and is not subdivided with groups.

 

Divisions

Division 1 refers to the presence of the hazardous material during normal operating conditions and indicates that a hazardous condition is expected to exist all or most of the time.

Division 2 refers to the presence of hazardous materials under abnormal conditions, such as during container failures, leaks or system failures. In this case, a hazardous condition is not expected to exist at all times and only under unusual conditions where hazardous materials would not normally be exposed to equipment.


Groups

Gases/Vapors 

Group A refers only to Acetylene which has an extremely high explosion pressure.

Group B refers to Hydrogen, gases with more than 30% hydrogen by volume, butadiene, and other gases with similar explosive properties.

Group C refers to ether, ethyl, and ethylene gases, and other gases of a similar potential.

Group D refers to gasoline, acetone, ammonia, benzene, butane, methanol, propane and other more commonly encountered compounds.

 

Groups C and D make up the majority of compounds encountered within hazardous locations and include petrochemicals and processed gases that are common working materials, products, or byproducts of industrial and commercial manufacturing and refining processes.

Dusts 

Group E refers to conductive combustible metal dusts such as aluminum and magnesium as well as alloys made from these materials.

Group F refers to carbon type dusts such as coal, charcoal, carbon black, and similar materials.

Group G refers to organic and synthetic dust compounds such as flour dust, sugar dust, starch, wood, plastics, composites, and dust from chemically derived materials.

 

Temperature Codes

Temperature ratings specify the maximum surface operating temperature of electrical equipment. If equipment is Classed Div 1, it must also carry the appropriate Temp code for certain materials according to their ignition temperature. If a device is approved for and used in a Class 1 Div 1 environment, yet operates at a temperature beyond the minimum ignition point of the materials that may be encountered, then the equipment is not in compliance and fire or explosion is still possible.

Temp codes cover a range of temperatures ranging from highest to lowest, and relate to us the suitability of equipment for use with various materials according to ignition temperature. As defined by the NEC, temperature codes are as follows. For reference, self ignition temperatures for some commonly encountered gases and dusts are also included.

NEC Temp Codes
Gases Ignition Temps
Dusts Ignition Temps
T1- 450°C 842°F
Butane - 287°C
Suspended  -  Layered
T2- 300°C 572°F
Ethyl acetate - 425°C
Cellulose
490 - 430°C
T2A- 280°C 536°F
Acetylene - 300°C
Cocoa
500 - 200°C
T2B- 260°C 500°F
Ethylene - 450°C
Flour
490 - 430°C
T2C- 230°C 446°F
Carbon Disulphide - 90°C
Lead
460 - 240°C
T2D- 215°C 419°F
Hydrogen - 500°C
Lignite
380 - 225°C
T3-  200°C 392°F
Acetone - 465°C
polyacrylonitrate
540 - 200°C
T3A- 180°C 356°F
Ammonia - 650°C
Soy Meal
540 - 340°C
T3B- 165°C 329°F
Ethyle-Nitrate - 90°C
Zinc
570 - 440°C
T3C- 160°C 320°F
Methane - 535°C
   
T4- 135°C 275°F
Carbon Monoxide - 605°C
   
T4A- 120°C 248°F
   
T5- 100°C 212°F
   
T6- 85°C 185°F
   




 


European Union, ATEX, and IECex Classification

For the European Union, classification and certification of equipment for hazardous locations is based on what is known as the ATEX Directive (ATmospheres EXplosibles) derived from standardizations developed by CENELEC and the European Committee for Electrotechnical Standardization.

IECex is a conformity Scheme developed by The International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC) and is intended to provide a single mark of conformity that can be accepted worldwide in order to facilitate trade and reduce certification procedures and costs. In essence, “one standard, one test, accepted everywhere.”

Similar to the North American certification markings in efforts to standardize safety, but differing in scope and overall goals, IECex/ATEX certification and marking differs significantly from the North American version in overall rating designations and how they are derived, which leads to some confusion among international consumers seeking to apply or sell ATEX or IECex compliant equipment outside of the EU or vice versa. Making matters more complex, the IECex and ATEX Schemes are predicated on dissimilar goals, with the IEC having their IECex Scheme directed towards providing a single international approval standard and ATEX being geared towards EU member compliances.  

Basically, IECex provides a single approval process and compliance standard intended to facilitate easier worldwide trade in compliant products, and ATEX facilitates standardization among EU countries. ATEX and IECex schemes are based on the same concepts and very similar, however, some differences such as dust ratings, protection methods markings and such are present. IECex is intended to provide countries and regions a method for providing internationally recognized hazloc equipment standards that can assure compliance from one participating country to the next, without the need for additional approvals and certifications under local regional regulations that can serve to increase costs and hamper trade.

 

Rather than systematically describe the entirety of IECex/ ATEX and EU standards, which would be an inordinately long discussion rather than simply long, we will focus on the basics of NEC - ATEX standards and how IECex/ATEX ratings compare and equate with US Classifications in order to hopefully make comparing US classifications to these standards more straightforward. We'll detail the basics, then offer example comparisons and details that should provide a better overall understanding of how these standards relate to each other, and what is needed to manage equipment compliance from one to the next.

 

To start with the most obvious differences, we'll note that there is no “Class” designation in European ATEX or IECex standards. In Europe, classification of hazardous locations is broken into two main groups, further divided with three zones for gases and vapors, and three zones for combustible dusts which are based in the type of location, when the hazard is present, the likelihood of it existing, and how long it may exist. This is similar to the US classification system of Class and Divisions, but as we will see, there is some variance.

There are no dust groups based on particle types and their properties with ATEX as there are with US standards. Instead, ATEX addresses dusts by temperature classification and material type (gas or dust). Also, the U.S. system sets its hazardous locations into two divisions rather than three zone types. Finally, ATEX/IECex also requires that equipment be marked according to the specific type of protection method it utilizes to achieve compliance (intrinsically safe, Flameproof, etc).

A breakdown of the basic ATEX/IECex classifications is as follows.


Groups

European standards divide equipment into two main groups, Group 1 and Group 2, based on the type of hazardous location.

Group 1 covers devices intended for use in mines where methane and coal dusts, otherwise known as Firedamp, represents the greatest hazard and is considered to be constantly present, and as a result rarely contains additional group category subdivisions. If other gases are to be present in a mine location, group 2 categories must be applied to group 1 locations.

Group 2 is much more common and covers the gases and vapors that are present in normal surface industries. These groups are further subdivided into three categories in order to more clearly define the necessary protection levels required according to risk levels in each group.

ATEX/IECex Group categories include, Group2 - Category 1, Group2 - Category 2 and Group2 - Category 3.

Group1- Category M1 refers to mining locations and denotes the requirement that equipment for use in this environment must remain functional even in the event of infrequent failures, and contain at least two integral safety features that will ensure continued safety even if one of the features fails. Additionally, if two faults occur in combination, protection must still remain.

Group1- Category M2 refers to mining locations and denotes that in the case of exposure to an explosive atmosphere the equipment must become de-energized.

Group2 - Category 1 is considered “very high protection” and refers to non mining equipment in above ground or surface locations for “use in areas in which explosive atmospheres caused by mixtures of air and gases, vapours or mists or by air/dust mixtures are present continuously, for long periods or frequently.”

Group2 - Category 2 is considered “high protection” and refers to non mining equipment in above ground or surface locations for “use in areas in which explosive atmospheres caused by gases, vapours, mists or air/dust mixtures are likely to occur occasionally.”

Group2 - Category 3 is considered “normal protection” and refers to non mining equipment in above ground or surface locations for “use in areas in which explosive atmospheres caused by gases, vapours, mists, or air/dust mixtures are unlikely to occur or, if they do occur, are likely to do so only infrequently and for a short period only."

 

Zones

Because the level of hazard can vary from one location to another within the same group classification, and not all locations have the same variables, location groups are broken into zones based on how likely the threat or hazard is. Additionally, rather than groups dedicated to specific material types such as gases or dusts, zones are also classified according to material types, with three for gases/vapors and 3 for dusts.

 

Gases/Vapors

ZONE 0: This zone refers to an area where an explosive atmosphere is always present or may be present for an extended period of time.

ZONE 1: This zone refers to an area where the atmosphere is likely to pose an explosion or fire hazard during normal operations.

ZONE 2: This zone refers to an area where an explosive atmosphere is not and should not normally be present during normal operations, and should it appear, will only be present for a short period of time.

 

Combustible Dusts

ZONE 20: This zone refers to an area where a cloud of combustible dust in the air is always present or may be present for an extended period of time.

ZONE 21: This zone refers to an area where a cloud of combustible dust in the air is likely to pose an explosion or fire hazard during normal operations.

ZONE 22: This zone refers to an area where a cloud of combustible dust in the air is not and should not normally be present during normal operations, and should it appear, will only be present for a short period of time.


 

Gas/Vapor Classification

Group 1 assumes the main threat is considered constant and posed by Methane, thus no gas subdivisions are normally included. Group II locations, however, offer a wide range of potential gases/vapors that need to be protected against, and as a result, the danger of gases is covered by subdivisions, with IIA being the least dangerous, to subdivision IIC being the most dangerous.

Basic group gas subdivision examples with Temp Code for each:

group I: methane, Temp code-T1

group IIA: propane, Temp code-T1

group IIB: ethylene, Temp code-T2

group IIC: hydrogen/acetylene, Temp code-T1

 

ATEX/IECex Temperature Codes

Unlike North American Standards, various dust types are not broken down into groups according to their potential. ATEX/IECec certifications instead rely on temperature codes to denote the safe operating range of equipment according to maximum equipment surface temperatures and the minimum ignition temperature of the materials the equipment may be in contact with. Temperature codes for ATEX/IECex equipment are as follows.

You will note, unlike North American temperature codes, ATEX/IECex codes are not broken down into further subcategories ie T3a, T3b etc. However, the ignition temperatures for materials are the same, so comparing North American and ATEX/IEC/ex codes is fairly straightfoward. 

 Temperature Code

 Max Temp

T1

450°C

T2

300°C

T3

200°C

T4

135°C

T5

100°C

T6

85°C

 

Protection Concepts

ATEX requires that equipment be marked according to the type of protection method it utilizes to achieve compliance. These methods fall under a range of different protection concepts which denote the way equipment achieves protection. Not all concept methods are suitable for all zones or group categories due to the level of protection each offers and the protection level required. The most commonly utilized concepts with their relevant zones and categories are listed below.

Concept
Applied Methods
Zone
Category
Ex "d"

Flameproof Enclosure

"Ex d" denotes the ability of a device to contain any ignition within itself and prevent the escape of any ignition from the explosure. Sparks, flame, ignited materials could exist or occur within the enclosure but are not permitted to escape and contact the atmosphere outside of the enclosure.

 

     1,2

             2
Ex "e"

Increased Safety

"Ex e" denotes that hazardous atmospheres penetrate the enclosure, but ignition is prevented because no arcs or sparks exist within the enclosure, and the surface temperature of parts or components is not high enough to cause ignition. A minimum ingress protection rating of IP65 is required for Ex e methods.

 

    1,2

            2
Ex "i"
Ex ia
Ex ib

Intrinsic Safety

Intrinsic safety is based upon limiting energy levels so that combustible atmospheres cannot be ignited. If two faults (short circuit or break) occur and the device is still intrinsically safe according to standards, the device is marked "Ex ia" and suitable for any zone including zone 0. "Ex ib" allows one fault and is suitable for use in zones 1 and 2.

 

  ia= 0,1,2
  ib=1,2

        ia-1
        ib-2
Ex "m”
Ex ma
Ex mb

Encapsulation

Encapsulation denotes sealing components representing potential sources of ignition from contact with ignitiable atmospheres by sealing them within thermoplastic, epoxy resin or similar materials, resulting in what is commonly referred to as "fully potted" components. Similar to Intrinsic Saftey, considering two allowable faults (short circuit or break) the device is marked "Ex ma". "Ex mb" considers one fault.

 

   1,2

             2
Ex "p"

Pressurized Enclosures

Pressurization denotes purging any hazardous gases that may be present within the enclosure by displacing it with large volumes of air or inert gas. Once purged, an overpressure condition is continued to prevent hazardous gas from entering.

 

   1,2

             2
Ex "q"

Powder Filled

Powder filling assumes that an ignition will take place. Inert powder or sand is used to fill around potential ignition sources to seal them from flammable or explosive compounds and reduce the possibility of ignition.
This method is used with electrical equipment and parts of Ex components that have:

supply current less than or equal to 16 A
supply voltage less than or equal to 1000 V
power consumption less than or equal to 1000 W

 

   1,2

             2
Ex "o"

Oil immersion

Oil immersion prevents ignition by surrounding potential ignition sources with oil, thus preventing contact with explosive atmospheres.Oil immersion essentially seals an electrical apparatus, thus making it impossible for explosive atmospheres to contact them.

    1,2

             2

     
       

 


Comparing ATEX/IECex  and North American NEC classification 

 

NEC Class 1 - Gases/Vapors                                    ATEX/IECex - Gases/Vapors

  Divisions                                                                     Zones

North America NEC ATEX/IECex Schemes
Division 1:

Hazardous material is present during normal operating conditions and and a hazardous condition is expected to exist all or most of the time.

Zone 0:

An area where an explosive atmosphere is always present or may be present for an extended period of time

 Zone 1:

An area where the atmosphere is likely to pose an explosion or fire hazard during normal operations.

Division 2:

The presence of hazardous materials is only expected under abnormal conditions, such as during container failures, leaks or system failures.

Zone 2:

An area where an explosive atmosphere is not and should not normally be present during normal operations, and should it appear, will only be present for a short period of time.

Gas Groups
Division 1 and 2

A (acetylene)
B (hydrogen)
C (ethylene)
D (propane)

Zone 0, 1, and 2

IIC (acetylene and hydrogen)
IIB (ethylene)
IIA (propane)

Temperature codes  Min Temp
Division 1 and 2 Zone 0, 1, and 2
T1- = 450°C T1- = 450°C
T2- = 300°C,  T2A- = 280°C,  T2B- =260°C,  T2C- = 230°C,  T2D- = 215°C T2- = 300°C
T3 = 200°C)
T3A- = 180°C, T3B- =165°, T3C- = 160°C
T3- = 200°C
T4- = 135°C
T4A (= 120°C)
T4- = 135°C
T5- = 100°C T5- (= 100°C
T6- = 85°C T6- = 85°C
ATEX / ICEex Typical Equipment Mark
Typical North American Equipment Mark

 



How North American Divisions Equate to IECex/ATEX Zones

The European designation of Zones may be equated to the US designation of Divisions, with both ATEX/IEC Zone 0 and Zone 1 fitting within the NEC’s Division 1, and ATEX/IEC Zone 2 being similar to the NEC’s Division 2. However, although Zones equate very well with Divisions, they are not identical. There is no well defined measure of time established within actual IEC or NEC standards regarding exactly how long and how often hazards may exist that can be used to definitively match Zones with Divisions. This means that it cannot simply be assumed that equipment approved for Division 1 use is automatically compliant to Zone 1 standards.

Generally speaking, the likelihood of a hazardous condition existing 1% or more of the time constitutes a Zone 0 location. For a Zone 1 location, likelihood between 0.01% and 1%, or no more than 100 hours per year is generally accepted. For a Zone 2 location, the likelihood of a hazardous atmosphere existing drops to no more than a single hour per year.

Additionally, a Zone 0 location is considered the most dangerous, and since there is no clearly matching classification within NEC standards for ATEX Zone 0, to provide some sense of compliance comparison between NEC and ATEX standards it should be assumed that Zone 0 requires intrinsically safe protection (incapable of creating, generating or accumulating sufficient heat or energy to cause inadvertent ignition of a flammable or explosive atmosphere).

 

Summary

It must be understood that all three dominant compliance schemes, NEC, ATEX, and IECex, differ in many ways, and that currently there is no direct method of acceptance between all three. The North American system of classification was developed wholly independant of the rest of the world, although evolving similarly due to the consistent nature of the hazards being addressed.

Currently, the United States has implemented a Zone system based on NEC article 505 into its classifications that is based in the ATEX/IECex Scheme. This North American Zone system is not identical to ATEX/IECex Schemes and thus equipment Zoned under NEC certification cannot automatically be considered compliant to IEXec/ATEX standards. Also, in order for equipment to be legal and compliant with local regulations, it must be certified to be in compliance with the applicable directives, standards and regulations. As a result, it is necessary for the individual to consult with the equipment manufacturer and the relevant certification body involved if attempting to apply equipment that has not been approved under the desired scheme in order to gain approval and ensure compliance.

 The bottom line here is, any equipment to be imported, sold or used in a particular region must be meet the necessary compliance requirements and have recieved certification from the certification bodies having approval for that region.

 

Special considerations-

ATEX equipment approval is required for all HAZLOC equipment sold or used within countries having membership in the European Union. If approval is accepted within one member country, it must be applicable to all.

IECex is expected to eventually become the internationally recognized approval body, which should remove the need to consider and design for disparate standards from region to region. The IECex Scheme is already in place in Europe as well as several other countries that have embraced European standards. It is also expected, however, that it will be some time before the IECex scheme is accepted worldwide, so it should not be assumed that equipment purchased now will become non compliant in the near future if it does not already conform to IECex standards. As country's switch to the IECex scheme, it has been common practice for a grace period of considerable duration to also be given, allowing ample time for managing compliance. 

North America is presently not operating with the IECex/ATEX schemes although some effort has been made to produce some homogeneity between North American and European Standards, most notably the US and Canada's adoption of a Zone system (NEC 505) modeled after European Schemes. However, despite the great similarity between North American and European Zone systems, they are not identical and are not interchangeable. 





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Explosion Proof Right Angle Light - Intrinsicallyy safe right angle flashlight - MADE IN THE USA
Static Conductive Duct for EPF-30P Explosion Proof Fan / Blower - 12" OD by 25 feet
Explosion Proof Strobe Light - 80 Flashes Per Minute - Class 1 Division 1 - IP67
Waterproof Flashlight - Explosion Proof Flashlight - 2 D-Cell - MADE IN THE USA
Explosion Proof Fan (Blower / Ventilator) - Electric - Portable - Hazardous Location Ventilation
Explosion Proof 26 Watt Fluorescent Handheld Light - Class 1 Division 1 - 100' Cord
Explosion Proof Pen Light - Class I Division 1 Groups A, B, C & D - 11 Lumens - 24 Hour Runtime
Explosion Proof Fluorescent Light - Hand Lamp (Drop Light) - 120 Volts - 100 foot SOOW Cord
26W Low Voltage (12 volt) Explosion Proof Fluorescent Hand Lamp (Drop Light) with Inline Transformer
Explosion Proof Drop Light - 24 Volt AC/DC - 100 Watt Incandescent - 100' Cord - Twist Lock Plug
Explosion Proof Fluorescent Handheld Light - Class 1 Division 1 and Class II Division 1
Explosion Proof Fluorescent Drop Light - 120 Volts - 75' SOOW Cord - 26 Watts - Class 1 Div 1
Explosion Proof 15 Watt Fluorescent Aluminum Drop Light - Class I Division 1 - 100' Cord
Explosion Proof Fluorescent Light - Hand Lamp (Drop Light) - 120 Volts - 250 foot SOOW Cord
Explosion Proof Fluorescent Light - Hand Lamp (Drop Light) - 120 Volts
Explosion Proof Drop Light (Hand Lamp) with Inline Transformer - 120 volts input to 12 volt
Explosion Proof Drop Light (Hand Lamp) with inline transformer - 120V or 240V to 12VAC or 24VAC
Electric Explosion Proof Blower / Ventilator - 4450 CFM - 16 inch - Class 1 Division 1
Explosion Proof LED Paint Spray Booth light - Class 1 Div 1 - Class 1 Div 2 - T6 - 7,000 Lumens
Static Conductive Duct - EPF-8P and EPF-10P Explosion Proof Blowers - 8 inch OD - 25 foot long -
Explosion Proof Drop Light (Hand Lamp) with inline transformer - 230VAC to 24VAC OR 24VDC
Explosion Proof LED Drop Light / Trouble Light -10 Watt LED - 120-277V AC - 100 Foot SOOW Cord
Explosion Proof Low Voltage Light Cart with Transformer - No Flat Tires - (4) Hand Lamps w/ 50' Cord
Explosion Proof LED Strobe Light - 12-36 Volts DC - 141 Candela - Class 1 Div 1.
Explosion Proof LED Strobe Light - 120-240 Volts AC - 141 Candela - Class 1 Div. 1
Explosion Proof Fan (Blower) - Electric - Portable - Hazardous Location Ventilation - Intl - 220V
12 / 24 Volt Explosion Proof LED light - UL Class 1 Div 1 & Class 2 Div 1 - Paint Spray Booth Cert.
EPF-30P Static Conductive Duct Coupler for Explosion Proof Blower
Explosion Proof LED Flashlight - 200M Waterproof - Lightweight - Battery Operated
Explosion Proof Fluorescent Hand Light & Cord Reel - Class 1, Div. 2 - 100' SOOW Cord
Explosion Proof Aluminum Fluorescent Drop Light & Cord Reel - Class 1, Div.2 - 100' SOOW Cord
Explosion Proof Aluminum Fluorescent Drop Light & Cord Reel - Class 1, Div. 2 - 50' SOOW Cord
Explosion Proof Hand Light - 26 Watt Fluorescent Light - Class 1, Division 1 - 25 foot Cord
Explosion Proof Hand Lamp -100/75/60 Watt - 120V AC - 50 Foot SOOW Cord - Class 1 & Class 2
Explosion Proof Hand Lamp -100/75/60 Watt - 120V AC - 25 Foot SOOW Cord - Class 1 & Class 2
Explosion Proof LED Drop Light / Trouble Light -10 Watt LED - 50 Foot SOOW Cord
Explosion Proof LED Drop Light / Trouble Light -10 Watt LED - 120V AC - 25 Foot SOOW Cord
Explosion Proof Hand Lamp with Explosion Proof Plug - 100' SOOW Cord - 60/100 Watt - 120VAC
Aluminum Coupler for Explosion Proof Ventilation Fan Ducts
Explosion Proof Compact Fluorescent Drop Light - 26 Watt Bulb -1700 Lumen - 100' SOOW Cord
Explosion Proof Compact Fluorescent Drop Light - 26 Watt Bulb -1700 Lumen - 50' SOOW Cord
Explosion Proof Compact Fluorescent Drop Light - 26 Watt Bulb - 1,700 Lumen - 25' SOOW Cord
Explosion Proof LED Strobe Light - 12-36VDC - Class 1, Div. 1 - Wall Mount
Explosion Proof LED Strobe Light - 120-240 Volts AC - Wall Mount - Class 1 Div. 1
Explosion Proof Dock Light - Class I, Div. I, Groups C & D - HPS or Metal Halide - Extension Arm
Class I, Division 2 LED Light - 2 foot, 2 lamp - Corrosion Resistant Construction (Saltwater)
Explosion Proof Paint Spray Booth LED Lighting - 2 Foot, 2 Lamp Fixture - Class 1, Div. 1
Explosion Proof Aluminum LED Drop Light & Cord Reel - Class I, Div. I - 50' SOOW Cord - 2' LED Tube
Explosion Proof LED Drop Light & Reel - Class I, Div. I - 10 Watt LED - 50' SOOW Cord - 1050 Lumen
Explosion Proof LED Drop Light & Reel - Class I, Div. I - 10 Watt LED - 100' SOOW Cord - 1050 Lumen
Rechargeable Explosion Proof LED Right Angle Clip Light - Class 1 Div 1 Groups C & D - Made in USA
7W Explosion Proof LED Flashlight - C1D1 - C2D1 - Battery Rechargeable - Spot/Flood - SOS Strobe
Explosion Proof Rechargeable LED Trouble Light - Class 1 Div 1 - 2 Battery Packs - Spot/Flood Combo
Explosion Proof Rechargeable LED Task Light - Spot/Flood Combo - 8hr. Runtime - Class I, Div. I
Explosion Proof LED Drop Light / Trouble Light -10 Watt LED - 120V AC - 150 Foot SOOW Cord
Explosion Proof LED Light with Emergency Ballast - 4' 2 Lamp - 48 Watts
Explosion Proof Electric Inline Axial Fan - Class I, Div. I - 15' Conductive Duct - 1/3 HP Engine
Explosion Proof LED Tank Light - 17,500 Lumens LED - Wheelbarrow Cart - 250' Cord - Class I Div 1
Explosion Proof LED Flashlight - Rechargeable LED Flashlight - 3 Modes - Class 1 Division 1
Class I Division 1 & 2 Explosion Proof 150 Watt High Bay LED Light Fixture 16,000 Lumens- Pendant
Intrinsically Safe - Dual Beam- LED Flashlight - Push Button Switch - 240 Lumens
Explosion Proof Spotlight & Cord Reel - 120/277V to 12VDC - 50 Watts - 50' SOOW Cord - C1D1
Explosion Proof LED Strobe Light - 4Hz Flash Rate - 10 Watts - Class I, Div. I - IP67
Explosion Proof 15 Watt Fluorescent Drop Light - Class I, Div. I - 50' SOOW Cord w/ Exp. Proof Plug
Explosion Proof 15W Fluorescent Drop Light - Class I, Div. I - 100' SOOW Cord w/ Exp. Proof Plug
Explosion Proof 15 Watt Fluoescent Hand Lamp - Class I, Div. I - 25' SOOW Cord w/ Exp. Proof Plug
Explosion Proof 26 Watt Fluorescent Hand Lamp - Class I, Div. I - 100' SOOW Cord w/ Exp. Proof Plug
Explosion Proof 26 Watt Fluorescent Hand Lamp - Class I, Div. I - 50' SOOW Cord w/ Exp. Proof Plug
Explosion Proof, 26 Watt Fluorescent Drop Light - Class I, Div. I - 25' SOOW Cord w/ Exp. Proof Plug
Explosion Proof LED Light - 17,500 Lumens - Class 1 Div 1 & Class 2 Div 1 - Adustable J-Bracket
Explosion Proof Rechargeable LED Flashlight - 405 Lumens - 5 Light Patterns - Intrinsically Safe
Explosion Proof Rechargeable LED Flashlight - 135 Lumens - Intrinsically Safe - Power Failure
Rechargeable Halogen Flashlight - Five Mode With Power Failure- 37,500 Candlepower
Rechargeable Halogen Flashlight - Five Mode - 37,500 Candlepower
Explosion Proof Fluorescent Light - Hand Lamp (Drop Light) - 120 Volts - 200 foot SOOW Cord
Explosion Proof LED Light - Non-Spark Aluminum Base - Single 150 Watt Led Light
Explosion Proof LED Cart Light - Class 1 Div 1 & Class 1 Div 2 - Group B Hydrogen Approved
Class I, Div. I Explosion Proof Fixture- IP67
Explosion Proof LED Light - Class I, Div. I - IP67 - Steady Burn - 120-277VAC OR low voltage
Explosion Proof Drop Light (Handlamp Only)-DW
Solar Power LED Explosion Proof Light - C1D1 - 30' 12/2 SOOW Cord - Day/Night Sensor - 12hr Runtime
Explosion Proof Metal Halide Light w/ Exp. Cord Reel - 70 Watts - 100' SOOW Cord - Class I, Div. I
Explosion Proof Compact Fluorescent Drop Light w/ Explosion Proof Cord Reel - Class I, Div. I - 26W
Explosion Proof Spotlight & Cord Reel - 120/277V to 12VDC - 50 Watts - 100' SOOW Cord - C1D1
Explosion Proof Incandescent Drop Light w/ Cord Reel - 100' SOOW Cord - Class I, Div. I - 100 Watts
Explosion Proof Fluorescent Drop Light w/ Exp. Proof Cord Reel - Class I, Div. I - 26 Watts
Class I, Div. I Explosion Proof LED Illuminator w/ Cord Reel - Manhole Mount - 16,000 Lumen
Class I, Div. I Explosion Proof LED Light w/ Cord Reel - Manhole Mount - 16,000 Lumen - 50' Cord
Explosion Proof Fluorescent Hand Lamp - 12VDC - 100 Foot SOOW Cord - 1800 Lumen
Explosion Proof Fluorescent Hand Lamp - 12VDC - 50 Foot SOOW Cord - 1800 Lumen
Indoor Intrinsically Safe Telephone and Exp Proof Isolation Barrier – C1/2/3,D1/2 - 120V/240V
Industrial Explosion Proof Telephone - Class I Div1 - Class II Div 1 - Class III Div 1 - Analog
Indoor Intrinsically Safe Telephone and Exp Proof Isolation Barrier – C1/2/3,D1/2 - 120V/240V
Indoor Intrinsically Safe Telephone and Exp Proof Isolation Barrier – C1/2/3,D1/2 - 120V/240V
Indoor Intrinsically Safe Telephone and Exp Proof Isolation Barrier – C1/2/3,D1/2 - 120V/240V
Stainless Steel Enclosure for Explosion Proof Phones and Intercoms
Explosion Proof VoIP Gateway Box
Explosion Proof-Tripod Mount-Single 150 Watt Led Light-100 foot cord
Explosion Proof String Lights - 8 Drop Lights - Class 1/II, Division 1
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